Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R), also known as physiatry, is a specialized branch of medicine that focuses on treating the function of the entire body, as opposed to the practice of treating a specific system. It is commonly referred to as patient-centered care. PM&R doctors, known as physiatrists, are rehabilitation physicians that completed training in the medical specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation and are experts in nerves, muscles, and bones. Physiatrists treat many different types of diseases and disorders such as chronic pain management, post-operative care, and specialist rehabilitation. The treatments they provide maximize their physical, social, psychological, and vocational potential by prescribing a variety of treatments. These can include sports physical therapy and sports medicine, therapeutic exercises, trigger point injections, and musculoskeletal ultrasounds, among many others. Most physiatrists work with a team of professionals to ensure the patient returns to optimal overall health. Other team members may include a rehabilitation nurse, psychiatrist or psychologist, occupational therapist, orthopedic surgeon, physical therapist, and clinical social worker. The members of the rehabilitation team will depend on the type and extent of injury, patient’s needs, insurance coverage, and facility resources. It is important for the patient and his or her family to remain engaged in the treatment plan to keep communication among the team members open and to ensure a more efficient...
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When is surgery right for you?

Rotator Cuff Surgery – Is it right for you? A common source of shoulder pain is a rotator cuff injury. A torn rotator cuff weakens your shoulder and can make everyday tasks such as getting dressed, driving, and showering difficult and painful. Surgery to repair the shoulder is recommended if the pain becomes chronic and does not improve with nonsurgical treatments. To help determine if rotator cuff surgery is right for you, consider the following: The length of your injury symptoms. If they’ve lasted at least six months to a year, surgery is recommended. If the tear is larger than 3cm Your shoulder has become significantly weaker Knee Surgery – when is it necessary? Arthritis in the knee causes pain, swelling, and stiffness from the inflammation of the joint. The most common types of arthritis in the knee are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and posttraumatic arthritis. Symptoms that persist despite nonsurgical treatments will likely require surgery. The different types of knee surgery are: Cartilage grafting. Tissue is taken from a healthy part of the knee to replace cartilage lost in the knee. This is generally done in younger patients who do not have a lot of damage. Osteotomy. To help relieve pain on the knee joint, the femur or shin bone is cut and reshaped. Arthroplasty – partial or total knee replacement. This is more common in older patients that have experienced chronic pain and when other treatments have failed. The damage cartilage and bone are removed and replaced by a plastic or metal joint. Dr. Carney at Bergen Orthopedics has successfully performed many rotator cuff and knee surgeries. To schedule a consult to help you decide what type of treatment is best for your type of injury, contact our...
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